Alcohol raises suicide risk by 800pc

September, 2014

Alcohol raises suicide risk by 800pc

ALCOHOL increases the risk of suicide by an alarming 800pc.

From The Herald

The Health Service Executive (HSE) has acknowledged that alcohol use, particularly in key age groups such as the 20-35 year group, can have a hugely damaging impact on mental health.

The revelation came as Ireland marked World Suicide Prevention Day.

A report by the HSE found that: “Alcohol can facilitate suicide by increasing impulsivity, changing mood and deepening depression.”

Suicide is now the leading cause of death for Irish men aged from 15 to 24 years.

Junior Cert celebrations should not involve alcohol

September, 2014

Junior Cert celebrations should not involve alcohol

“It’s natural that students who are getting their Junior Cert results today want to have a good time and celebrate with their friends. This is an important milestone for them and they should enjoy the celebrations,” said Suzanne Costello, CEO of Alcohol Action Ireland.

“However, these celebrations should not involve alcohol and there is a real and immediate obligation on alcohol retailers – pubs, nightclubs, supermarkets, shops and off-licenses – to ensure that they are not selling alcohol to people under the age of 18.

More students opt for UCC’s ‘dry’ apartments

Demand for booze-free housing in University College Cork has increased this year, leading to a major expansion of a student wellbeing programme.

From the Irish Examiner

Six people signed up for ‘dry’ apartments at the college-run Victoria Lodge student accommodation complex at Victoria Cross when the scheme was announced last year.

However, a spokesperson for UCC confirmed last night that 24 students have opted for the accommodation this year.

“The rise in demand has convinced UCC Campus Accommodation to expand the scheme further by introducing a dedicated social programme as part of a move towards wellbeing housing,” he said.

‘Don’t cut taxes on alcohol in budget’

From the Irish Examiner

And ministers could solve the financial hole left by a ban on alcohol sports sponsorship by placing a levy on the drinks industry.

Alcohol Action Ireland estimates that a levy of 1c on a standard drink would generate €30m annually, which it said was more than the industry spends on sports sponsorship every year. “We have seen in recent years that increases in excise duty have reduced alcohol consumption and generated significant additional revenue for the exchequer, while cuts in excise duty have had the opposite effect,” said Suzanne Costello, AAI chief executive in its pre-budget submission.

Government urged not to bow to pressure of profit-driven alcohol industry in Budget 2015

September, 2014

Government urged not to bow to pressure of profit-driven alcohol industry in Budget 2015

Alcohol Action Ireland, the national charity for alcohol-related issues, has urged the Government to prioritise public health over private profit in Budget 2015 and resist calls for a cut excise duty on alcohol.

“We have seen in recent years that increases in excise duty have reduced alcohol consumption and generated significant additional revenue for the Exchequer, while cuts in excise duty have had the opposite effect. Therefore, to cut excise duty makes no sense for the physical, mental or financial health of the nation,” said Suzanne Costello, CEO of Alcohol Action Ireland.